Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Movie Review ~ Rob Roy: The Highland Rogue (1953) with Richard Todd



If you know me at all closely, chances are you know that (un-grownup-ish as it is) when I get really, really, really excited I squeal–and generally a dance of some sort ensues. In this case it was the polka.

I promise no spoilers, but here are a few teasers. It’s in the highlands of Scotland. And it’s in the early 1700’s. And there are bonnets and tartans everywhere. And the hero is splendid–a hero with just grievances and personal flaws to face.

And he has a beard.

And–unbelievably–he could almost–almost–(almost so nearly it hardly matters)–be Captain Bryant. Who’d have thought it???!!! :-)


We first saw Richard Todd in The Adventures of Robin Hood (which is little known but quite good) and I–rather obviously–really like his rendition of Rob Roy MacGregor.


Some other familiar faces are: Glynis Johns (Mrs. Banks in Mary Poppins), James Robertson Justice (Little John in the Richard Todd Adventures of Robin Hood), and Archie Duncan (Little John in the b/w Robin Hood tv series with Richard Greene). (And yes, I did get all those Richard’s and Robin’s and Little John’s straight. ;-))


The acting was very good and as far as content, I would say it fits into the same class as, for instance, Swiss Family Robinson. I wouldn’t necessarily recommend it for younger children, though, as the intensity is a little different than SFR and the warfare is ongoing throughout the entire film with quite a few hand-to-hand fighting shots.


Of the ending, I can think of about five words in summary–any one of which has gunpowder potential to give it away. But I do want to give you an idea, so here they are (you can tell me how they sound): honor…humility…trust…sacrifice…and headship. I won’t tell any more, but suffice to say, it’s good–really, really, really good. Shall I squeal??? :-)

(Oh, and a quick note. It's quite distinct from Sir Walter Scott’s tale of the same name which is an entirely different story. :-))


18 comments:

  1. I liked this movie too. We watched it a couple years ago when we were studying Scottish history in school.
    My sisters laugh when I say "Rob Roy MacGregor" in a Scottish accent. :D

    And you're right; this is a good movie. ;)

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    1. Yes, when I was about 12 to 16-ish, I was pretty crazy about Scotland. The history...the tartans...Sir Walter Scott...books and literature of all sorts, in fact. Of late years, I rather thought my enthusiasm was evening out and I could take it or leave it, but no-it's still there. ;-)

      And I'm so glad you like it, too! :-)

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  2. I've never seen this movie before and from your review it looks like I should look into it. ;-) Where do you find all these great classics?

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    1. Oh, I do hope you can! It is really good. :-) I would say, in general, we find them mostly by digging here and there...and following rabbit trails. And then I try to be sure and share them! ;-)

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  3. When I was younger I never really liked these types of movies, but now that I am "older" I have grown to really enjoy and treasure them. I hope to add this to my small movie store. :-P That's how I find good movies too! That or YouTube. :-P I just need to share the ones I find. My sister found a few years a go North and South and that was it! We were hooked! That's been the find of last few years. :-)

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    1. Exactly! And we do a lot on Wikipedia, too. Oh, and N&S is a huge favorite with me, too. ;-)

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    2. I remembered you saying that you really liked North and South - I can't believe that I've only just found out about it really. :-p

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  4. This is completely random, but I was wondering why your blog is named "Along the Brandywine"??

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    1. I'm so glad you asked! ;-) I've actually thought of writing something up on it for my "About" page, but haven't quite figured out how to phrase it yet. :-) It actually comes from two places/ideas (besides the fact that I just love the sound of it): Tolkien's Brandywine River in LOTR and Howard Pyle's Brandywine School of Art (where N.C. Wyeth trained). I wanted a name that could grow and change with me, and that would define a place where I could share all sorts of things. The Tolkien Brandywine influence (for me), kind of epitomizes all the different swirling and yet ordered events that make up the story of our lives. I also love art: whether it’s powerful story written or acted out, music, dance, paintings—or a tracery of fresh green leaves against the summer sky. I guess one of my definitions of art is simply all of the strong beauty God gives us—the beauty that fills us to the full and at the same time tugs at our heartstrings, filling us with an aching longing for more.

      So that’s most of what factored into it. Initially, though, the name itself pretty much just popped into my head—and then I proceeded to realize just how much it actually pulled everything together. :-)

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    2. Wow, Heidi! Thank you for such a detailed description of your blog name. I kinda figured that Tolkien was part of the name, but I've never heard of N.C. Wyeth or Howard Pyle's Brandwine School of Arts. :-/ I think the name of your blog is very original and unique. :-)

      Thank you again for giving me the details of everything! I must say that I've enjoyed our getting to know one another through blogging. :-)

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    3. You’re welcome…and thank you! ;-)

      The Brandywine school is pretty interesting to study because, as I understand it, Pyle and his students really brought the field of illustrative art into fine art circles. Two of Pyle’s more well known books that you might have seen are Otto of the Silver Hand and The Wonder Clock, though I actually like some of his pirate stories quite a bit, too. Wyeth illustrated a lot of the Scribner’s Classics like Treasure Island, Robinson Crusoe, Kidnapped, David Balfour, Michael Strogoff, The Black Arrow, The White Company (now republished by Books of Wonder), and so on. (Those are just a few of the ones I’ve read, but he did a lot more.) One of my favorites of his is Adventurer Oxenham from Westward Ho! (a tremendous tear-jerker, though it ends with joy).

      And likewise! I’m enjoying getting to know you, too. :-)

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    4. You must think me very UNread because I've not heard of Otto of the Silver Hand, The Wonder Clock or Adventure Oxenham from Westward Ho! :-/ I HAVE heard of Treasure Island and Robinson Crusoe though.

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    5. Oh, well I'm sure you've read some I haven't! ;-) And don't worry about it... Part of the reason I started blogging in the first place was to share things I've discovered, so I love to hear when someone else discovers something new via me. :-)

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  5. Well, I finally got a chance to leave a comment here. :) Sorry it took me so long!
    This movie definitely sounds good-I hope our library has it!
    Especially since it has Richard Todd in it. It's funny because I hadn't heard of him until recently and now I keep stumbling upon movies with him in it! Thanks for the review! :)

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    1. You're most welcome! And I do hope you can see it sometime soon! ;-)

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  6. A quick question-who is the girl in your signature image? I just wondered what movie she's from. Thanks!

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    1. That’s Helen Mary–Rob Roy’s wife. She was played by Glynis Johns who is probably most well known for her role as Mrs. Banks in Mary Poppins. The other place I’ve seen her thus far is in a very short appearance near the end of the 1956 classic Around the World in 80 Days with David Niven.

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    2. Okay, thanks! :) I've seen both movies that you referred to, but I can't say I remember her in Around the World! ;)

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